About

 

Stadssigill_foer_staden_Luebeck

 

Pronounced Sh-veng-uh Beng-guh

Schwenge Benge was an expression in medieval German. It was coined by traders from the Hanseatic League, primarily from Lubeck, who were some of the wealthiest and most powerful merchants of their day.

It was used as an admonition or an exclamation, often directed at those more greedy, containing the wish that, whilst their own trade was profitable, that it should not result in the reduction of others, and that their own activities might serve for betterment, and not worse-ment.*

In our Australian context, although we are several centuries removed from the powerful Hansa, the term may still be employed – as an expression that we, profitable as we are, might hope that our lives, and the life of our astonishing country, are not leading the disaffected astray, but rather helping them arrive at the conclusion of our own prosperity.

It is in this spirit that we give you these humble articles of faith, which are, incidentally, also literal articles.

 

Nuremberg_chronicles_f_265-66_(Lubeca)
The Imperial Free City of Lubeck, 1493

 

 

Author

 

Martin Quinn is an author and actor, and writes and edits The Schwenge Benge. The publication is the natural consequence of a great passion for reading and writing and little outlet for it.

Martin studied acting at the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, and prior to that, completed one full part-quarter of an arts degree at Monash University.

Martin lives in Melbourne, in first person.

 

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AN EXPRESSION OF OUR PURPOSE

https://theschwengebenge.com/2018/02/02/mission-statement/

 

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*DISCLAIMER

The Schwenge Benge possesses a questionably true origin story.

 

 

 

 

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The Schwenge Benge is written by Martin Quinn, and updated without great constancy, but some frequency. 

The publication is interpretive, analytical and artistic in nature. It may be that it is slightly satirical, or deeply personal, quietly empirical or a combination of all three. One must decide for oneself whether the content is worth the time of day.

As it discusses topics of all stripes with great, unbending fortitude, it may be worth noting that some articles will form points of disagreement. Please remember that this publication is written in the spirit of amity and discussion, and that disagreement is not only welcome, but encouraged. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced, in any part, without the express written permission of the author.